My top 10 conservatory plants

Having experimented with many different plants in my glasshouse over the years I’d like to share with you the 10 that have given the most pleasure for the least fuss. Here goes.. 1. Jasminium polyanthum. Yes that’s the very common one you can buy almost anywhere but especially as a gift at Christmas. Move it into a big pot or better still into a planting hole in a green house border and it will reward you with three months of heavenly scent starting in late winter when you need it most (the Christmas gifts will have been forced on...

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Malus domestica ‘Sturmer Pippin’

If you spot an apple tree still bearing fruit at this time of the year, chances are it will be a Sturmer Pippin. This is a very late cropping variety that was highly regarded in the Victorian period because it keeps so well on (and off) the tree; it will remain hanging on into January if the birds don’t get there first! This is a useful late apple to grow, because in September and October there are so many other autumn treats from which to choose. So exactly when you harvest the fruit depends upon geographical location, location in...

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Quiz answers

Question 1. It’s called the gin and tonic plant! If you brush against its foliage it emits the fragrance of a delicious G & T. Chin chin! 2. Plant identification A. Helleborus foetidus. Grows best in thin chalky soils and I snapped this striking specimen last December, obviously loving life in car park of the Weald and Downland Living Museum at the foot of the South Downs at Singleton, West Sussex. The naturalistic planting schemes around the new gateway building are just one reason to visit this fascinating outdoor museum of historical buildings and I can thoroughly recommend their...

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Not getting our posts?

Hi folks, so sorry for a second email this week, we promise we won’t make a habit of it but we recently moved to Mailchimp to issue our weekly blog and, YIKES! some people say they’re not getting it because it’s going straight into their spam folder. We’re so sorry if this is the case for you. Could you take a few seconds to search for our blog in your spam folder, go to our email address, right click it, and then choose ‘add new contact’. You should always get our blog into your inbox again after that. Thank...

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